Benefiting from its own turf, Land Rover manage to create a huge celebration on its 70th anniversary. It all happened at the Goodwood Festival of Speed, where a convoy of 70 rare and important Land Rovers stole the show at Goodwood Festival of Speed yesterday as part of a record parade up the famous Goodwood Hill.

The largest ever batch of vehicles to drive up the famous hill were led by a recreation of the very first Land Rover – a Centre Steer prototype – and ‘HUE 166’, the first Series I pre-production prototype from 1948. The Series I was such a success that it spawned the Series II and Series III, an example of which became the millionth Land Rover sold just 28 years after the very first prototype. 

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That millionth car also appeared in the parade, as part of a group of 25 early Series I, II and III vehicles including fire engines, SAS vehicles, aircraft crash rescue and African expedition heroes – demonstrating the breadth of versatility of Land Rover over the years.

All four generations of Range Rover featured in the convoy, including a Trans-Americas Expedition example which crossed the all-but-impassable Darien Gap in 1971 and a 2004 example used by Cheshire Police. Also present was Land Rover’s Discovery nameplate showcased with an example of each of the five generations, including a round-the-world expedition car, the first Discovery ever built and the millionth Discovery to roll off the line.